E.coli sculpture by Luke Jerram hangs in the grand gallery of the National Museum of Scotland.

Luke Jerram: E.coli

National Museum of Scotland

This 90ft long inflatable sculpture by Bristol-based Luke Jerram will be suspended from the ceiling of the National Museum of Scotland’s Grand Gallery (NMS). T​he E.coli is 5 million times bigger than the real bacteria. When standing next to it, does the bacteria alter our personal sense of scale? Does it look scary, beautiful, comical or alien? Will audiences be attracted or repelled by it? 

Bacteria were the earliest form of life on our planet, and so this artwork could be considered as a curious portrait of our distant ancestors. If there is life on other planets (or moons) in our solar system, it may well look like this. This artwork, brought to Edinburgh with the support of the University of Sheffield, was also made to reflect upon the importance of bacteria in our lives. Although some forms of Escherichia coli (or E. coli) bacteria can cause illness and even death in humans, the use of the bacteria is vital in medical research.

Brought to Edinburgh with the support of the University of Sheffield and UKRI strategic priority fund -“Building collaboration at the physics of life interface”

Luke Jerram: E.coli

Artist

Luke Jerram

Venue

National Museum of Scotland

Chambers Street, Edinburgh, EH1 1JF

0300 123 6789

info@nms.ac.uk

www.nms.ac.uk/scotland

Opening times

Daily

10am - 5pm

Visitor information

  • Wheelchair Accessible
  • Accessible Toilets
  • Toilets
  • Babychange
  • Café
  • Shop
  • Bike Stand

National Museum of Scotland

Chambers Street, Edinburgh, EH1 1JF

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